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Transferable skills

What skills will a History degree from Cambridge give me?

This course is designed to develop a number of important skills in undergraduates. Among these are:

  • acquiring a broad range of historical knowledge and understanding, including a sense of development over time, and an appreciation of the culture and attitudes of societies other than our own;
  • evaluating critically the significance and utility of a large body of material, including evidence from contemporary sources and the opinions of more recent historians;
  • engaging directly with questions and presenting independent opinions about them in arguments that are well-written, clearly expressed, coherently organised and effectively supported by relevant evidence;
  • gaining the confidence to undertake self-directed learning, making the most effective use of time and resources, and increasingly defining one's own questions and goals.

These are valuable skills in themselves. They are also highly sought after by employers. Well-qualified History graduates from Cambridge have no difficulty in getting good jobs in a very wide range of occupations - in business and finance, in public administration, in journalism and broadcasting, in teaching at a number of levels, or in research-based careers of various kinds. History is not as obviously vocational as some courses, but it combines an excellent training in vital skills with a high degree of interest and enjoyment.

Below is a more comprehensive table of transferable skills that a History degree from Cambridge will equip you with:

INTELLECTUAL SKILLS

Faculty

Colleges

Lectures

Supervisions and Classes:
- Discussion
- Reasoning
- Argument
- Critical Analysis

Classes

Examinations, Long Essays and Dissertations

COMMUNICATION SKILLS

Faculty

College

Written:
- Dissertation
- Long Essay

Written: weekly essay for supervision, other essay assignments

Oral: weekly discussion of essay/dissertation
general discussion with supervisors & peers including in college classes

Oral:
- Class discussion for Themes and Sources, HAP 'follow-up' classes and Special Subject; also provided on many other Papers, especially in Part II.

Other activities:
- College committees, societies, acting, JCR involvement

ORGANISATIONAL SKILLS

Faculty

College

Management of workload and extra-curricular activities

Lecture/class attendance

Submission of weekly essay

Submission of Long Essays and Optional Dissertation

Organisation of events (sports, societies, entertainment)

INTERPERSONAL SKILLS

Faculty

College

Group work for Themes & Sources and Special Subject

College as experience in Community living

Service on Faculty committees

Participation in college classes, societies and sporting clubs

RESEARCH SKILLS

Faculty

College

Use of Faculty and University Libraries

Use of College Libraries

Development of bibliographic skills

Development of bibliographic skills

Research for long essays and dissertation

Research for weekly essay

NUMERACY

 

Faculty

College

Quantitative/statistical analysis (in general lectures and those for obligatory paper in British economic history)

Quantitative/statistical analysis in supervisions for this paper.

COMPUTER LITERACY

Faculty

College

University Computing Service Courses

Use of College computing facilities for word processing essays/dissertation

Word-processed 3rd year dissertations and Themes and Sources/Special Subject Long Essays

Use of College computing facilities for www, email.

FOREIGN LANGUAGES

Faculty

College

Language options in Themes & Sources for Part I

Varying provision of classes for developing subject-related and general foreign language skills

Other papers in Part I and Part II offering opportunities to use foreign language sources

University Language Laboratory