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Core seminar in economic and social history

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 Michaelmas Term 2019

Seminars begin at 5pm in the Old Library, Darwin College (entrance on Silver St).. Each seminar is followed by drinks and (usually) dinner with the speaker. All welcome!

 

 This seminar is a combination of nine seminar programmes:

Medieval economic and social history;
Early modern economic and social history;
Modern economic and social history;
Quantitative history;
Global Economic History
The Centre for Financial History;
The Centre for History and Economics;
The Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure;
The Centre for Quantitative Economic History.

Their specialist seminar programmes do not run in Michaelmas term, but each meets separately again in Lent and (sometimes) Easter.

 

10 October

Simon Szreter (Cambridge)
‘Drawing on History for Radical Policy: Incentivising an Ethical Economics’

 

17 October

Morgan Kelly (University College Dublin)
‘The Safety Revolution in Oceanic Shipping, c. 1780-1825’

 

24 October

Prof. Tracy Dennison (Caltech)
The Political Economy of Serfdom: State Capacity and Institutional Change in Prussia and Russia

 

31 October

Cheng Yang (Cambridge)
‘The Occupational Structure of China (1736-1898) and the Great Divergence’

 

7 November

Elise van Nederveen Meerkerk (Utrecht)
Women Workers of the World United. Towards a Global History of Households, Gender and Work

 

14 November

Guido Alfani (Bocconi University) and Matteo Di Tullio (University of Pavia)
Roundtable on
The Lion’s Share: Inequality and the Rise of the Fiscal State in Preindustrial Europe (2019)
Commentators: Prof. Craig Muldrew, Prof. Sheilagh Ogilvie, and Dr. Pedro Ramos Pinto

 

21 November

Alexandra Sapoznik (King’s College London)
'Did peasants plough? Agricultural technology and the growth of the medieval economy'

 

28 November

Prof. Peter Scott (Reading)
The anatomy of Britain’s inter-war super-rich: reconstructing the 1928 ‘millionaire’ population

 

5 December

Prof. Richard Smith (Cambridge)
The Tyranny of a Concept: the Origins of the European Marriage Pattern

 

The core seminar is grateful for the support of Darwin College and for the generosity of the Trevelyan Fund.

Seminar coordinators:Hillary Taylor (), Amy Erickson (), and Leigh Shaw-Taylor ().

Economic and Social History at Cambridge: www.econsoc.hist.cam.ac.uk

 

 Michaelmas Term 2019 programme - print version

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Archived seminar programmes

Michaelmas Term 2018

Michaelmas Term 2017 

Michaelmas Term 2016 

Michaelmas Term 2015

Michaelmas Term 2014

Michaelmas Term 2013

Michaelmas Term 2012

Michaelmas Term 2011