skip to primary navigationskip to content
 

Digital History

The Digital History graduate training series combines discussion, hands-on workshops and guest lectures. All seminars take place at 12.30-2pm on Tuesdays in Room 9 of the History Faculty.
A sandwich lunch is provided. This term, we will continue with our series introducing digital methods for historians. No previous experience with digital history is required and all are welcome! Reading lists and websites relevant to each topic will be available in advance of each session on the course moodle page.

More information about the graduate training programme can be found here

 

Lent Term 2018

This term will introduce selected digital methodologies and techniques for analyzing historical sources. We will critically explore what is and is not possible with digital methodologies, and how understanding more about the digital environment in which we live and work can enhance our research. No previous experience with digital history is required and all are welcome! Reading lists and websites relevant to each topic will be available in advance of each session on the course moodle page.

 

We also invite you to register for training workshops with the Cambridge Digital Humanities Network’s Machine Reading the Archive series, which will complement our seminars:

You can view this term’s options and book online here:      https://www.digitalhumanities.cam.ac.uk/Methods/mtra/mrtaoverview

 For further information, or to be added to the moodle site, please contact Leigh Denault (ltd22)

 Wednesday, 31 January: Public & Popular History Seminar: "History on Apps": You are warmly invited to join the Public & Popular History seminar's next session, on Wednesday, 31 January, 5pm, in the Knox Shaw Room in Sidney Sussex. We have invited two experts to share their experiences with "History on Apps": Benjamin Leibowitz will talk about his current non-profit start-up, "Passed", a geo-locational history app based on volunteer content, and
will compare notes with Rachel Sinfield, Head of Communications & Engagement of the Fitzwilliam Museum, who is managing the production of a variety of Augmented-Reality apps, among them Cambridge's contribution to the England's History Cities consortium:
http://www.heritagecities.com/stories/explore


13 February: Wikipedia, the Digital Age, and ‘Traditional’ Historical Knowledge: We all know and love (or love to hate) Wikipedia, but how much do you know about how it works, and how it is changing knowledge production and dissemination around the world?


20 February: Text Analysis II: Introducing Sentiment Analysis and Natural Language Processing (NLP): This class will introduce more advanced techniques for exploratory data analysis, and the possibilities open to you if you become a ‘programming historian’


27 February: Doing History in Public: learn more about this exciting graduate-run faculty blog and making your research accessible to wider audiences (led by Mobeen Hussain) 6 March: Presenting and archiving your research materials using Omeka: Learn how to use this popular and simple program to prepare powerful and layered presentations and research archives which can layer image, text, and audio/visual material.