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Source Exercise 4: The Wars of the Roses 13

  • Definitely true Yes. This can be shown from the evidence here in relation to Henry VI, not least in the fact that Edward was able to throw him off his throne twice. If Mancini’s account is true even in part, it suggests a much surer political touch than anything Blacman suggests for Henry VI. It is harder to be quite so certain in relation to Richard III, especially as the sources do not go into detail about either man’s conduct of policy. However, it is reasonable to infer, even from a hostile source like the Crowland Chronicle, that Richard, having planned his coup, was not so successful in dealing with the aftermath. In this compares unfavourably with Edward IV after his coup against Henry VI, and also with his own nemesis, Henry Tudor.
  • Probably true Yes. This is certainly true for Henry VI; it is more open to debate in relation to Richard III, but the sources suggest that Richard, having planned his coup, was not so successful in dealing with the aftermath. In this compares unfavourably with Edward IV after his coup against Henry VI, and also with his own nemesis, Henry Tudor.
  • Possibly true No. This is probably too cautious a judgement, given the strong evidence that Edward was more capable than Henry VI. The comparison with Richard III might be more open to debate, though the sources suggest that Richard, having planned his coup, was not so successful in dealing with the aftermath. In this compares unfavourably with Edward IV after his coup against Henry VI, and also with his own nemesis, Henry Tudor.
  • Definitely untrue No. There is no basis in the evidence for suggesting that Edward was definitely less capable than Henry VI, nor can it be argued from the evidence here that Edward was definitely inferior to Richard III.
  • Not shown by the evidence No. It might be argued that a subjective judgement like this can only elicit this response; however the evidence does allow us to go further and to reach a more definite judgement.


Questions

J d) Richard III murdered the Princes in the Tower.

  • Definitely true;
  • Probably true;
  • Possibly true;
  • Definitely untrue;
  • Not shown by the evidence.

 

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