Josh Ivinson

PhD candidte in Early Modern History
I am a final year PhD candidate at St Edmund's College, Cambridge. My research examines the earliest regular transaltantic enterprises to be set out from England - those of the Newfoundland and New England fisheries - during their early years of expanion (1550-1630). This heavily archive-focused work involved the extensive surveying of unindexed legal depositions (High Court of Admiraly, Court of Chancery, and several other local courts), customs records (TNA E190 Port Books), and numerous other micro-historical sources (from over 25 archives in London and South West England) to gain a deeper insight into the socio-economic reality of this groundbreaking transaltantic industry. This research attempts to broaden and partially overturn narrow state- and settlement-focused discussions of the early English Atlantic by illuminating the activities of the thousands of ordinary fishermen, mariners and merchants who drove England's first regular intercontinental trade.



The outcomes of my research are indisciplinary, offering important data regarding: the environmental hsitory of fishing and overfishing in the Atlantic; historic revolutions in food consumption; patterns of seasonal settlement and transitory maigration in pre- and early- colonial North America; legal, social, and institutional responses to the expansion of English economic enterprise into the New World; and the economics of Early Modern maritime trade.



I am also an Associate PhD Researcher at the Trinity Centre for Environmental Humanities (Trinity College Dublin).



During my graduate studies I have completed heritage sector Research Fellowships at the National Maritime Museum's Caird Library Fellowship (2017) and the US Naval History & Heritage Command in Washington, DC (Research Intern, 2014). I have also contributed to published academic work as a Research Assistant for the Group for the History of Population and Social Structure (University of Cambridge, 2015) and the Trinity Centre for Environmental Humanities (Trinity College Dublin, 2020)
Atlantic History; Environmental History; Economic & Social History; Early Modern History; Institutions; Globalisation; Networks; Proto-industrialisation; Legal History
January 2019. ‘Managing risk in England's earliest Transatlantic Enterprises: The Newfoundland Fisheries, 1550-1630’, The British Commission for Maritime History: King’s Maritime History Seminars, King’s College London



October 2018. ‘The English transatlantic fishing revolution 1500-1633’. Oceans Past VII Conference, Alfred Wegener Institut & Deutsches Schifffahrts Museum, Bremerhaven, Germany



July 2018. ‘Institutions & proto-industry in England's transatlantic fishing 'revolution': 1550-1630’. International Postgraduate Port and Maritime Studies Conference, University of Hull



May 2018. ‘Local institutions and trans-national networks in the earliest years of the English Newfoundland trade’. Datini-ESTER Advanced Seminar, Prato, Italy



February 2018. ‘Assessing the navigational and geographical knowledge of England's first transatlantic fishermen’. Caird Library Seminar Series, National Maritime Museum, Greenwich



April 2017. ‘From Cornish pilchards to Newfoundland cod (c.1550-1630): A case study of the proto-industrial growth of sea fisheries in the South West of England, and their pioneering Atlantic-Mediterranean trade networks’ (Poster). Economic History Society Annual Conference, Royal Holloway University, London

Key publications